going all the places, running all the races, eating all the things

Tag Archives: eggs

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Hella cute little fit out at this lovely little cafe. Only open weekdays though, a trap for rookie Hobart visitors.

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The menu is hiding inside these books.

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Great coffee, black as night, rich but unburned and served with souvenir spoons.

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The boyo loved his latte too.

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Scrambled eggs with rhubarb relish. Love the idea of savoury rhubarb options, gorgeous tart contrast.

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Mushroom brothers – seasoned with garlic and dark soy. Delicious and sweet.

Next time would come back for lunch – menu looks wonderful!

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Shoebox Cafe on Urbanspoon


This place came recommended by twitter buddies and had some interesting spots on Foodspotting. It’s also perfectly located for a brunch before visiting Salamanca Markets (which I will discuss in a future post – suffice to say that though it had some lovely things, it is definitely not Hobart’s best market).

Started with a table menu supplemented with this impressive list of specials – some of which I believe are on the menu most of the time, others which come and go). 20131008-224612.jpg
First things first though – cappuccino. Good coffee. 20131008-224720.jpg
Green tea for me, always nice to have leaf tea rather than bags.
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And this is why we came here – scrambled eggs wrapped in smoked salmon served on a Danish. Possibly not super healthy but boy what a combo! The Danish maintained structure and provided pleasing flakiness.
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These were pre-prepared in the cabinet, them heated up for orders. Mercifully (miraculously even) the eggs were still nicely oozy and moist.
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Breakfast was a large brioche bun filled till bursting with crème pâtisserie and topped with fresh raspberries. Decadent and delicious as you can maybe tell by my face here.
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A visit to the toilets takes you past this gorgeous old industrial mixer and the other machine below whose function I couldn’t quite work out..
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The cabinet had other gorgeous things too which would definitely call me back for a lunchtime visit next time!
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Particularly this one – how good does this sound?
Jackman & McRoss Bakeries on Urbanspoon


In Australia often the mark of a new city is the quality of its cafes. These do tend to be where you can feel a city’s pulse – how worldly it is and how much it has found it’s own culinary voice. On these indicators based on Pigeon Cafe alone Hobart is doing very well.

The shuttle bus from the airport went past on the way to our hotel, and boy am I glad it did!

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Love a blackboard menu and this on has a great mix of new and unfamiliar things, at great prices (for a Sydney diner where $15+ breakfasts are the norm).

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Couldn’t resist the raclette panino with onion agrodolce. Sweet and salty and oozy and crunchy – basically the perfect grilled cheese.

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The Boy had baked eggs with talleggio & preserved lemons. Beautiful & with store made organic bread.

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Coffee as great too, rich and strong but not bitter. Lovely sweet milk too.

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A touch of history in the toilets.

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The counter cabinets which would prove too tempting later..

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… Practically forcing me to get this divine little rye bruschetta with fresh mozzarella, white anchovy & borage flowers.

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Fresh salt crusted white baguette, out of the oven only half am hour before. Truly in the top 10 loaves I have has in my life. Would eat again!

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What a lovely & welcoming entry to Hobart. And if the staff at Pigeon & other places are a guide, it’s true that Tasmanians are far more friendly than us mainlanders.

Pigeon Hole on Urbanspoon


There are so many cafes on the little strip at Bronte that it can be hard to choose – you walk up and down umming and ahhing trying to choose. We made the right decision on this occasion – wanting something hearty with lots of vegetables & different flavours; a buffet on a plate as it were.

The coffee was quite excellent. Rich and deep, no hint of bitterness.

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I ordered the vegetarian breakfast board – feta and lovely pesto with sesame seeds, juicy meaty mushrooms, perfectly oozy poached eggs, roasted tomato and golden slabs of gorgeously squeaky haloumi. Not cheap at $17 but did count for 2 meals after all 😉

Only let down was the kind of boring white bread, forgot to ask for an alternative so my own fault really!

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BF had more of those amazing mushrooms, haloumi, spinach, poached eggs and hommous ($15). He raved about the mushrooms too.

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Love the little planks/surfboards the food came on. Would definitely eat again, but maybe share next time – if I wasn’t so hungry!

Cafe Q
469 Bronte Road
Bronte Beach

Cafe Q on Urbanspoon


Scotch eggs are one of my favourite finger foods for a party – they are kind of retro and kitch, but also delicious and travel well if you slice upon arrival and can keep them relatively cool. They can also be prepared in advance.

This was my first attempt at making vegetarian scotch eggs. When I ate meat it was easier, buy sausages and squoosh out the filling then wrap this around boiled eggs and fry. The vegetarian option however involved a little more prep, but the results were most definitely worth it – these were good and just about healthy enough to consider as an occasional week night dinner with a salad on the side.

Some of the vego recipes online involved buying vegetarian sausages but that seemed both a bit expensive and overly processed. I was inspired by this recipe, which I tweaked a little to make it simpler and to match it to my palate and what was in the cupboards.

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Ingredients 

8 eggs – 6 medium hard boiled, about 5 minutes or so, then peeled, 2 beaten in a bowl*
1/2 a red onion, finely chopped
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 grated carrot, as rough or fine as you want
2 tins chickpeas
2 teaspoons of smoked paprika
3 teaspoons of chilli flakes
1 teaspook cayenne pepper
100 grams flour
100 grams panko (preferred) or breadcrumbs or quinoa flakes
Enough oil to medium shallow fry

Method 

1. Fry onion, garlic and garlic in olive oil until soft
2. Add chilli flakes and paprika and fry for another minute before removing from heat
3. Drain chickpeas and add both tins to the onion mix and plenty of salt and pepper
4. Get a stick mixer (or appliance of your choice) and blitz the mixture so that it’s still a bit chunky but all sticking together – then let the mix cool
5. Arrange 3 bowls in order – flour, then beaten egg, then panko with cayenne and salt and pepper
6. Get the chickpea mix and divide it into 6 balls
7. Place one ball onto a small piece of clingfilm then put another on top, flatten it out gently with your fingers – you want it big enough to just wrap around an egg
8. Coat one egg in flour, then remove the top piece of clingfilm carefully and wrap the mix around the ball. Put it to the side and repeat 7-8 with the remaining 5 eggs and mixture
9. Each chickpea wrapped egg should now be dipped in the beaten egg, then in the panko so that it is well coated. You can double dip them if you have time. Then pop in fridge for 10 minutes. 
10. Heat the vegetable oil in the pan you intend to fry in, make sure there’s enough oil that it will come at least halfway up each scotch egg. I use a little pot that has room for 2 scotch eggs at a time. Make sure the oil is hot enough before putting them in, should immediately sizzle. Once nicely golden remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel.

I like my scotch eggs cold, so would then pop them into tupperware and slice before eating. If you’re taking them to a picnic or something pack them uncut and they will travel better. Normally you would cut them in half but as they are quite big I also served some cut into quarters, if you make them with quail eggs then just cut them in half.

* If making with quail eggs I’d suggest a pack of 10 or a dozen, and two regular chook eggs for coating them.



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